Virtual Volcano (Mini)Vacation challenge WINNER(S) – Estadio Chivas

Estadio Chivas (formerly Estadio Omnilife) in Guadalajara, Mexico – Photo by Juan Olivas [CC BY 2.0] – via Wikimedia Commons

By now you may have figured out that this is no ordinary volcano, but then again, I am no ordinary volcanohead. I understand why people might want a little more volcano in their lives, even if they already have an ample supply nearby. Volcanoes are awesome forces of nature, beautiful to look at when they’re asleep, and totally badass when they’re awake. Perhaps the construction of this “volcano” was inspired by Vulcano Buono in Italy which was underway at the time this one was designed, and if a shopping mall deserves such an awesome edifice, then a world-class football team certainly does too.

Completed in 2010, this football stadium cost around 2 billion Mexican pesos (around $200 million USD) and is the fourth largest stadium in Mexico. Designed by French architects Jean-Marie Massaud and Daniel Pouzet, the concept was “…born of the idea of ​​a green volcano within which the life of the stadium develops, ending with a “cloud” that gives protection through a cover that seems to float on the volcano”.  The stadium was originally named after Omnilife, a multi-level marketing venture owned by Jorge Vergara, who also ownes the football club Club Deportivo Guadalajara, less formally known as Chivas.  Since its official opening on 30 July 2010,  it has not only replaced its name with the more popular team name, but also in 2012 replaced its eco-friendly but inferior-according to-footballers artificial turf with actual grass.

Aerial photo of Estadio Chivas – Photographer not credited – Image via Taringa.net

The exterior of the stadium is almost fully surrounded by an earthen berm that has been graded into a 43° slope covered in 21,600 sq m of natural grass. This helps partially insulate the interior of the stadium from central Mexico’s high temperatures as well as contribute to oxygen production and the stadium’s volcanoey appearance. The “cloud” is a hollow reinforced metal structure that provides ample shade to spectators during the day while still allowing plenty of natural light to enter the concourse around the seating area.

Concept drawing of the concourse of Estadio Chivas – creator not credited – Image via SkyscraperCity.com

The stadium has a seating capacity of 45,364 and among other modern design features, incorporates many exits from the seating area and eight emergency exits from the stadium so that, at least in theory, the facility can be evacuated in eight minutes in the event of an emergency, be that natural or man-made.

View from pitch-level inside Estadio Chivas – Photo by Notimex – image via MedioTiempo.com

Perhaps a foreseen “man-made emergency” involving impassioned football fans was what the designers had in mind. The official opening-night game was a “friendly” match between Chivas and Manchester United, in which Chivas prevailed victorious 3-2.  I am not sure what the center structure suspended over the field is, but I am guessing it is a camera array for televising the matches. It also appears capable of being removed for different sorts of events.

Thank you to all who have played or followed along.  This automatic-posting thing was a bit of a necessity, as I have an important family event happening today and am in-and-out a-comin’-and-a-goin’ and won’t likely be home before the wee hours of tomorrow morning..at which time I will post winner name(s) and adjust the score.  Also, I’ll still be running VVVc #114 as usual this coming Monday evening.

Happy April Fools Day!

UPDATE!

I received no correct guesses for this volcano, so it appears this is one of the rare occasions Li’l Volcanohead has stumped the Search Party.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s